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Can Summer Camps Battle Summer Learning Loss? 

Well, we better!

If you haven’t watched the video on summer learning loss produced by Horizons National and narrated by Brian Williams, please take the time to watch it.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ahhj3wxxkdM&feature=colike

This piece clearly illustrates how the achievement gap grows from summer to summer and year to year.  Our summer camps need to be ready to address it – intentionally.
I work for a YMCA Camp & Conference Center, the South Mountain YMCA (www.smymca.org).  As an organization, we believe it is our responsibility to make sure that every child can attend summer camp, regardless of their families ability to pay our fees.  In fact, it is this belief, this promise, that gets me out of bed every morning.  I want to make sure our summer camp programs are available to all kids.
I saw this video for the first time last spring and my jaw dropped.  It made me re-evaluate everything I was working so hard to build.  I had been focused on creating excellent programs imbued with values and skills development, building premier facilities with an eye on safety and comfort, hiring and training superb staff that encourage friendships and our campers’ self-esteem, and raising the funds to make it available to all kids.  I was not focused on reading, writing, and arithmetic.  I am looking at my personal mission a little differently today.

What Can Camps Do? 

  1. Intentional Involvement.  Make sure our programs are available to all kids – regardless of a family’s socio-economic background.
  2. Intentional Enrichment.  Camp Professionals know our programs provide enrichment activities.  We teach new skills, values, and promote the development of trust, communication, and teambuilding.  Are we providing opportunities to read or write through camp library programs, camp newsletters, story time, songwriting, etc.?  Are we providing “math moments” by scoring archery tournaments, when we set tables or put out chairs at meal times, or when we do bird counts in our nature programs?
  3. Intentional Motivation.  Are we letting our campers know how important we think it is for them to continue to learn, grow and develop?  We need to encourage achievement – and then celebrate it.  We need to celebrate academic achievement, athletic achievement, and service achievement.

Summer Camps make a tremendous, positive impact on a child’s life – but I believe we can do more.  Good Luck!

We’ll see you at Camp!

Nathan

*For more information on Nathan’s programs at the South Mountain YMCA Camps, visit www.smymca.org.

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