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Recently, a new camp director asked me for some thoughts on marketing a shiny, new summer camp.  I started writing a paragraph and wound up with a novel.  So, I did what any self-respecting camp director and blogger would do – I broke it into 3 parts.  For you, dear reader, this means you can eat the elephant one bite at a time.  For me, it means I get three posts for the price of one!

Tomorrow we’ll begin the series with Part 1:  Marketing Summer Camp Without (a lot of) Money.  Before we launch, I wanted to share a few disclaimers.

Disclaimers:

  1. No amount of marketing can fix a broken program, run-down facility, or poor customer service.  Fix these things first.
  2. Use high touch as well as high tech.  Commit to getting out of camp and meeting people.  Whenever feasible, bring people to your site to interact with you and your staff.  Use high tech marketing to promote your appearances and camp events (e-blasts, FB Ads or Invites, online ads and listings).
  3. Know your camp’s strengths and what makes your program unique.  Being able to distinguish yourself from the pack is critical.
  4. Know your target market and the demographics of your current campers.  This will guide you as you decide how to spend your precious marketing dollars.
  5. Every camping guru will tell you that word of mouth is the holy grail of marketing.  Your task is to determine how to nurture and encourage this form of camper recruitment.  Again, knowing the demographics of your camper family populations is crucial.
  6. No one has ever decided to be a camping or recreation professional because they were great at marketing.  When you’re putting together your program’s marketing calendar, ask for a second opinion, and then get a third.  Make sure these opinions come from someone with some expertise in sales or marketing.
  7. I am not a marketing guru, graphic designer, web developer, or sales genius.  I am just a camp guy.  I’m not sayin’ – I’m just sayin’ . . . .

Don’t Gamble!  In my experience, marketing is both an art and a science.  More often than not, we lean on the art rather than the science.  As Jim Collins made clear in Great By Choice, great efforts in business were rarely a moment of pure insight or innovation.  Rather, successful enterprises used empirical research to guide them to that success.  Another good point by Mr. Collins involved the notion of firing bullets before cannonballs.  In marketing, this might mean you try a particular promotion in a limited launch to determine its efficacy before committing all your resources to it.  Move quickly.  Be innovative.  But more importantly, be smart.

Finally, I’d like to share my favorite quote of the week.  “Do something. If it works, do more of it. If it doesn’t, do something else.”  This advice comes from Franklin D. Roosevelt and it has served me well in marketing.

We’ll see you at Camp!

Nathan

For more information on Nathan’s programs, YMCA Camp Conrad Weiser and Bynden Wood, visit the South Mountain YMCA Camps’ website at www.smymca.org.

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This might be the easiest resolution you could make in 2012:  Get out and visit a summer camp.

If you are a parent of a potential summer camper, there is no substitute for the information you can glean about a summer camp during a camp visit.  Sure, you can read the glossy brochure, watch the videos, and visit the website.  You will digest a lot of information.  You might even feel like you’ve done your homework.  You haven’t.

Go for a visit.  Walk the trails, sit in the chapel, put your hand in the water along the shoreline – and talk to the staff.

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This afternoon I had the good fortune to visit a friend and fellow camp professional, Dave Bell, and YMCA Camp Colman outside of Seattle, Washington.  It was a needed reminder about the importance of taking the time to connect with the people and places that will become important in our children’s lives.  Camp Colman is beautiful, but Dave and his staff make it magical.

When you are looking for that special place this summer for your new camper, look for good people first.  When you find that, the rest will fall in place.

We’ll see you at Camp!

Nathan

For more information on Nathan’s camp programs, YMCA Camp Conrad Weiser and Bynden Wood, visit www.smymca.org

For more information on Dave Bell’s summer camps, visit http://www.campcolman.org/ or http://www.camporkila.org/.

Can Summer Camps Battle Summer Learning Loss? 

Well, we better!

If you haven’t watched the video on summer learning loss produced by Horizons National and narrated by Brian Williams, please take the time to watch it.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ahhj3wxxkdM&feature=colike

This piece clearly illustrates how the achievement gap grows from summer to summer and year to year.  Our summer camps need to be ready to address it – intentionally.
I work for a YMCA Camp & Conference Center, the South Mountain YMCA (www.smymca.org).  As an organization, we believe it is our responsibility to make sure that every child can attend summer camp, regardless of their families ability to pay our fees.  In fact, it is this belief, this promise, that gets me out of bed every morning.  I want to make sure our summer camp programs are available to all kids.
I saw this video for the first time last spring and my jaw dropped.  It made me re-evaluate everything I was working so hard to build.  I had been focused on creating excellent programs imbued with values and skills development, building premier facilities with an eye on safety and comfort, hiring and training superb staff that encourage friendships and our campers’ self-esteem, and raising the funds to make it available to all kids.  I was not focused on reading, writing, and arithmetic.  I am looking at my personal mission a little differently today.

What Can Camps Do? 

  1. Intentional Involvement.  Make sure our programs are available to all kids – regardless of a family’s socio-economic background.
  2. Intentional Enrichment.  Camp Professionals know our programs provide enrichment activities.  We teach new skills, values, and promote the development of trust, communication, and teambuilding.  Are we providing opportunities to read or write through camp library programs, camp newsletters, story time, songwriting, etc.?  Are we providing “math moments” by scoring archery tournaments, when we set tables or put out chairs at meal times, or when we do bird counts in our nature programs?
  3. Intentional Motivation.  Are we letting our campers know how important we think it is for them to continue to learn, grow and develop?  We need to encourage achievement – and then celebrate it.  We need to celebrate academic achievement, athletic achievement, and service achievement.

Summer Camps make a tremendous, positive impact on a child’s life – but I believe we can do more.  Good Luck!

We’ll see you at Camp!

Nathan

*For more information on Nathan’s programs at the South Mountain YMCA Camps, visit www.smymca.org.

Unlike many of my posts, this one is not for parents – this one is for summer camp professionals.  If you are a camp professional (or just a parent who wants a look behind the curtain), read on!

Tis the season to start planning summer camper recruitment for next year.  As such, I want to share my recruitment mantra with you –  in rank order of importance:

  1. Bring Families to Camp (High Touch)
  2. Take Camp to Families (High Touch)
  3. Use the Vast Digital Billboard (High Tech)

Bring Families to Camp

I did not write “bring kids to camp” (they aren’t the decision-makers), and it is no accident I didn’t write “bring parents to camp,” (they won’t pay the deposit without knowing their child is very interested).  Bring Families to Camp!  I’ll bet it even fits your mission.  Throw free events like Spring and Fall Festivals!  Hold Community or Family Fun Days!  Heck, if you’re looking for revenue streams, run more Family Camp Weekends.  The point is, get families to camp.

Bringing a family to camp allows:

  • Parents to get comfortable with your facility – and the drive to reach it.
  • Parents see their kids interacting with your staff.
  • Parents interact with your staff

You can’t pay for this sort of promotion and recruitment – which is why these events should be free!  I want to stress, these are not Open Houses.  The traditional Open House Event is a tour of camp and a sales pitch.  I am suggesting you bring families to camp, let them play, and let camp sell itself.

Of course, some of our camps are too remote to make good use of all of these events, but don’t let your location be an excuse.

Take Camp to Families 

Many camps utilize Camp Fairs as their sole opportunity to personally interact with families interested in learning about summer programs.  If you have the budget to pay the registration fees, staff time, and travel – good for you.  But don’t let that be the full extent of your outreach efforts.

Where does your camp traditionally recruit well from?  Make a list of those locations.  Then, starting in September, attend “Back to School Nights,” community fairs and festivals, etc.  At each appearance, do something fun with kids – don’t just show up with brochures or dvds.

If you are an independent or private camp, you probably lack storefront locations.  So, identify places that can serve as your storefront.  Starting in December and January, ask libraries if you can hold camp information nights (and then promote those nights online).  Ask a restaurant.  Ask a  college.  Make sure there is adequate parking at whatever location you choose – and make sure families are comfortable going there.

Use the Vast Digital Billboard

If you’re reading this post, you are already using technology to better your camp and its recruitment efforts.  I bet you are placing Facebook or Google ads.  Well done.  If not, let me try and sell you on why you should be.

In the old days, we used newspaper/magazine ads, phone books, cable spots and billboards to raise the awareness of our programs.  The problem is, very few of these efforts were easily quantifiable.  Quite often, it felt like we were shelling out a lot of cash for very little return.  Online ads answer this particular concern.

With an online ad, a potential camp parent can click your ad and follow it to your website.  Try doing that with the Sunday paper.  Not only that, if you are cheap like me, you can choose to pay only when someone actually “clicks through” to your website.  A million people may see your ad before someone follows it to your site, but you only pay for that single referral.  There’s a lot to love about pay-per-click advertising.

If you’re watching your pennies, I recommend you put your money into search engine ads (ex. Google or Bing) before you invest in ads on social networking sites.  Your ad will be more effective if it is shown to people who are already searching for summer camp.

A final word about online ads.  Your first inclination will be to promote your summer camp program this way.  May I recommend using it year-round to promote your efforts to bring families to camp and to take camp to families?

Of course, all the online ads in the world will not make a difference it your website is awful or the person answering your phones is rude.  Make sure you are ready for the calls and web visits.

Conclusion

I hope I’ve given you something to think about as you plan your marketing efforts for next year.   As your looking at your calendar, give priority to those efforts that put you in front of both kids and parents.  Work to bring families to camp.  Use online marketing to promote your summer camp – but also to encourage families to come to your facility or other camp events in their region.

Stay tuned for thoughts on Camper Retention!

If you’re hungry for more, check out Dave Bell’s marketing article in Camp Business entitled “Small is the New Big.”  You can find it at http://www.camp-business.com/articles/cb/small-is-the-new-big.

We’ll see you at Camp!

Nathan

In preparing for summer camp, parents ask a lot of questions – as they should.  What happens when a child get homesick?  What kind of activities will my child be able to participate in?  How will your staff help my child make friends?

All of these are good, valid concerns.  But my favorite question, hands down, is “How far away is too far away to send a child to summer camp?”

How Far is Too Far for Summer Camp?

If you are a reader who likes his or her answer up front, let me satisfy your curiousity immediately with a 2 part response:

  1. It depends on the child attending camp.
  2. It depends on the parent who is sending the child to camp.

Now its perfectly clear, right?  Perhaps not.  But it was helpful, right?  Again, perhaps not.

This summer, I ran a poll on LinkedIn  and asked adults this very question (http://linkd.in/mMvo0b).  With a few votes shy of 200 responses, my results are less than definitive, but the comments were pure gold.  I simply asked, “If you were sending a 10 year-old to sleep-away camp, what is a comfortable distance?” 

When framing my responses, I used times (less than 1 hour away, 1-2 hours away, 2-4 hours away, anywhere in the country, and anywhere in the world), but I did not define how a camper might be travelling.  In my opinion, once campers are travelling more than 4 hours away (by car, boat, train, or plane), they are too far away for parents to rush to their aid in the same day.  When campers are 4 or more hours away, they are “beyond reach.”  Coincidentally, this is how I picked a college.  I wanted a school that my parents could not easily visit.  I chose Grinnell College in Iowa, a full 16 hour drive from my home in Pennsylvania. 

As you might expect, responses to this simple question were all over the map (pun intended).

  1. 21% of respondents felt comfortable with their child attending camp less than 1 hour from home.
  2. 34% of respondents were comfortable with their child attending camp 1-2 hours away.
  3. 27% of respondents felt comfortable with their child attending camp 2-4 hours from home.
  4. 9% of respondents were comfortable with their child attending camp anywhere in their home country.
  5. 9% of respondents felt comfortable with their child attending camp anywhere in the world.

If you take the time to review the results in more detail, you would find a trend towards older parents feeling more comfortable with their children traveling further from home than younger parents.  You wouldn’t see significant differences between men and women.

My Advice to ParentsThe perfect camp will be where you and your child’s comfort levels intersect.  Some kids are ready at 7 to fly across the country.  Some parents will never be ready for their children to be an hour away from them.  As my father is fond of saying, “moderation in all things.”  Look for the compromise. 

Look for the point at which your comfort and your child's comfort intersect.

Please keep this in mind:  Your goal should be to challenge your child and push her a step beyond her comfort level.  If you keep her too close, she may not feel challenged and/or independent.  If you push her too far out of her comfort zone, she may not benefit from the experience.  The same thing goes for you as a parent.  If you’re a parent who believes you can’t live without your child sleeping in the next room, look for the camp that is an hour away or less.  Don’t immediately send your camper across the country.  Moderation.

My Advice to Camp Directors:  “What?” you may wonder, “What does this post have to do with the art of camp management?”  Well, it should impact how you look at your marketing work.  Most parents responding to this poll, 55%, are comfortable sending their child to a camp less than 2 hours away.  82% of all parents who responded to the survey are looking for a camp that is less than 4 hours away from their home.  So, if you are on a limited marketing budget, focus on promotional events and ads that are within 2 hours drive of your camp.  Half of all parents looking for sleep-away camp next summer will be comfortable with your location.

We’ll see you at Camp!

Nathan

Be sure to visit Nathan’s camp program (YMCA Camp Conrad Weiser and Bynden Wood), The South Mountain YMCA Camps, at www.smymca.org.

I believe in the power of summer camp.  There, I said it.  My name is Nathan Brant and I am a summer camp believer. 

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I may, however, be part of a dwindling number of believers.  In this era of specialization, the value of a traditional summer camp experience with archery, canoeing, campfires, nature walks, horseback rides and rock climbing is more difficult to explain to perspective families, foundations, and educators.  Traditional Day & Resident Camps are like liberal arts colleges.  We teach behavior before skill – we teach how learn and interact successfully in groups.  More and more, society seems to turn away from the notion of liberal arts and the well-rounded individual.  We are witnessing an unprecedented growth in technical or magnate schools at all levels, and the same thing is happening with summer camps.

Now everyone has gotten in on the Camp Game.  Museums, churches, schools, YMCAs, YWCAs, Scouts, community foundations, state parks, and conservancy groups are all running camps.  We have soccer camp, art camp, dance camp, eco-camp, robotics camp, swim camp, lacrosse camp, and many more.  Each of these programs teaches a skill.  They teach kids to be a better soccer player, a better inventor, a better artist, or a better swimmer.  Meanwhile, traditional summer camp programs continue with their less glamorous work – teaching kids how to be better people.

In my summer camps, Bynden Wood YMCA Day Camp & YMCA Camp Conrad Weiser (www.smymca.org), we strive to help our campers develop into successful adults.  Regardless of the camp activity, we teach our kids the lessons of leadership.  Whether on horseback, the archery ranges, or the climbing tower, we intentionally work to improve a young person’s communication skills, we focus on the development of interpersonal trust, and we provide opportunities for problem-solving.  When a young person leaves our program, we know he or she is better prepared to serve as a leader, or be a responsible member of a group being led.

Being a great soccer player may be important through high school or college.  Being a great leader is important for life

My name is Nathan Brant, and I am a summer camp believer.  Perhaps there is a support group for people like me . . . .

We’ll see you at Camp!

Nathan

For more information on the relevance of summer camp, check out the American Camp Association’s article, “An American Tradition – Camp,” at http://www.campparents.org/American-Tradition.

So you have made the decision to send your child to summer camp.  It was a great decision.  Your children will learn about the outdoors and themselves while meeting interesting people and making new friends.  Well done. 

Now you have questions, “Is my child ready for this?”  “Am I ready for this?”

Don’t Panic

It’s early now and you have time to worry about the “big questions.”  Remember why you felt a summer camp experience was important for your child.  As he matures, it’s important for him to take his first steps into the-big-bad-world.  There is no safer, better supervised environment for him to test the wings of his new-found independence than in summer camp.

Ask Questions

What your 4th grade English teacher said was true, “there are no stupid questions.”  If you, the parent, never went to summer camp, we expect you to have a lot of questions.  Even if you went to summer camp last century, believe us when we say a lot has changed.  Parents should call, email, or visit their summer camp until they have every questioned answered.  Don’t worry about us, we love to talk about camp.

Stay in Touch

Join your camp’s Facebook page.  Follow your camp on Twitter.  Visit the camp website every week.  Visit camp for a tour, an open house event, or attend a family camp program.  The more interaction you have with camp staff, the more comfortable you will be when your child goes away for a week or two this summer. 

Visit

You’ve seen the brochure.  You watched the videos.  You’ve visited the website.  You’ve talked to camp staff.  Visit the camp!  It will be worth the trip, and it will give you and your new camper another chance to ask questions and get comfortable. 

Be Brave for Your Child

After 20 years on summer camp staff  there is a dirty little secret about homesickness I think you ought to know:  Your fond farewells on the first day of camp can often cause – or alleviate – homesickness.  If your camper sees you are nervous and sad at the start of camp, she will feel that way, too.  She will often feel sad for you.  Be strong for your new camper.  Let her know how excited you are for her to have this new experience.  Let her know you will be alright while she is gone.  It could make all the difference.

Take Time for Yourself

Parents deserve a break.  Summer camp can give you that break.  You are unlikely to ever have a better trained person looking after the needs of your child than during a week of summer camp (other than you, of course).  Most camp staff are CPR and 1st Aid certified, they have been trained in dozens of fun games and activities, they sleep in the same room with the kids they care for, and watch what they eat at meals.  Take a break while your child is away and in good hands.  Watch a movie.  Visit a spa.  Recharge your batteries.

Celebrate the Accomplishment

Celebrate the accomplishment of completing the first week away at summer camp (for you and your child).  After camp, go to a favorite restaurant and share with your child how proud you are of him.  Chances are, he will have a lot to talk about. 

Know that your child is going to learn new things, build self-esteem, make new friends, and be cared for by excellent camp counselors who are there for you child.

We’ll See you at Camp!

Nathan

Be sure to visit Nathan’s camp, The South Mountain YMCA Camps, at www.smymca.org.

*This article was started by Jeff Henry, the summer camp intern at YMCA Camp Conrad Weiser, and finished by Nathan. 

Download the FREE E-Book! 

If you’re a camping professional, or someone passionate about camping, I think you will enjoy this book.  More than 20 authors have contribued 37 articles on the relevance of camping in today’s world, the positive impact it has on children, the future of teambuilding, camping, outdoor education and much more.

To download the free PDF, visit the Summer Camp Theme Guy website at www.nathanscottbrant.com

Click Here to Download the Free E-Book

 

Authors include: 

  1. Nathan Brant Summer Camp Source FORGET THE EXPERTS:  PART 1
  2. Mike Davria  www.CampLeadership.org  DON’T BE A DINOSAUR
  3. Jim Cain www.teamworkandteamplay.com NEXT
  4. Adam Issadore Path To Rhythm Group Drumming  FAMILY
  5. Mike Ohl www.gotcamp.org  CAMP IS LIKE . . .
  6. Sue Casine YMCA Camp Foskett  DIFFERENT AND FUN
  7. Pete Rondello, Sr. YMCA Camp Manito-Wish  TRANSFORMATION
  8. Jason Smith YMCA Camp Kitaki  TELL YOUR STORY
  9. Jill Tipograph www.EverythingSummer.com TODAY’S TEENS:  GENERATION ME
  10. Peter McGregor Peter McGregor THE COMMUNITY CULTURE OF CAMPFIRE
  11. Aaron Cantor Aaron Cantor 80 HOURS
  12. Matt Tuckey Matt Tuckey TECH ADDICT
  13. Randall Grayson www.visionrealization.com WHERE THE RUBBER MEETS THE ROAD
  14. Randall Grayson www.visionrealization.com YOUR VALUE PROPOSITION
  15. Randall Grayson www.visionrealization.com WHO ARE YOU?
  16. Rick Garland Rick Garland THE CALL OF THE JUNIOR COUNSELOR
  17. David Seddon David Seddon IT’S A SMALL WORLD
  18. Dave Hennessey YMCA Camp Tuckahoe 257 FRIENDS
  19. Dave Bell www.CampLeadership.org 10 RESPONSIBILITIES OF A CAMP DIRECTOR
  20. Nathan Brant Nathan Scott Brant CELLS
  21. Mike Ohl www.gotcamp.org OVERDELIVER
  22. Brent Birchler Brent Birchler CAMP VALUES
  23. Jill Tipograph www.EverythingSummer.com TEEN VOLUNTEERISM
  24. Shawn Moriarty www.asinglefootstep.com LOOKING FORWARD:  ADVENTURE & ROPES
  25. Randall Grayson www.visionrealization.com  STOP MARKETING!
  26. Matt Ralph Summer Camp Culture  SOMETIMES WE WANNA GO
  27. Dan Weir Dan Loves Camp  BULLYING
  28. Randall Grayson www.visionrealization.com WHY RETURN RATES DON’T MATTER  
  29. Scott Arizala The Camp Counselor  KIDS WITH DIFFERENT NEEDS
  30. Smith & Chenoweth Camp Augusta  THE ART OF WORLD BUILDING
  31. Dan Weir Dan Weir TECHNOLOGY
  32. Randall Grayson www.visionrealization.com LEADERSHIP BENCHMARKS
  33. Shawn Moriarty www.asinglefootstep.com RENEWAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION
  34. Jason Smith YMCA Camp Kitaki FOCAL POINT
  35. Travis Jon Allison Camp Hacker A NERDY KID
  36. Jill Tipograph www.EverythingSummer.com CAMP PEOPLE
  37. Nathan Brant Summer Camp Theme Guy  FORGET THE EXPERTS:  PART 2

Be sure to visit Nathan’s camp, The South Mountain YMCA Camps, at www.smymca.org.

I am such a fan of alliteration.  I really can’t help myself.

Yesterday I was part of a podcast run by Travis Allison at www.CampHacker.org.  There were a number of great topics, but one stuck out in my mind:  Camp Staff Attitude Toward Working With Parents

Here’s the thing:  Some camp directors and staff (mostly folks who have been doing this a while in remote locations), view parent calls, requests, and visits as intrusive.  For camp professionals, and most parents, part of the overnight camp experience is that children spend time away from their parents and siblings to discover who they are outside of the family bubble.  This opportunity for self-discovery is truly powerful – even life-changing – but that doesn’t mean parents don’t have a place in camp.

Of course Parents have a place in camp!

A good camp (in my opinion), will look for opportunities to partner with parents.  From a camp perspective, there is a lot parents can contribute to my program that I could not accomplish without them.  Let’s face it, who’s better recruiting new campers?  It’s not me.  Most research will tell you camp’s rely on word-of-mouth to grow their program.  Parents (and campers) recruit new families to our program every day.  Here’s my Top 5 List on Partnering with Parents (Camp Perspective):

  1. Marketing:  I said it at the top.  Camps know that their best marketing tool is word-of-mouth.  We count on families referring families.  I recommend that camps engage their families to actively help market their program. 
  2. Program Development:  Camps are constantly looking for ways to improve their program, their customer service, their marketing, or their registration process.  Why not ask parents?  After all, kids come to camp, but parents pay for it.  I recommend camps hold 2 focus groups each year to collect parent input.  There is no downside to hearing what your families think about your camp.
  3. Service Project Volunteers:  Like marketing, many camps already partner with families to complete service projects on their behalf.  Whether you are building a playground, raking leaves, recruiting board members, or raising funds for a capital campaign, call your families and ask them to help.  If you are a non-profit and rely on the generous contributions of donors to fulfill your charitable mission, there is good research that suggests that people who simply consider volunteering their time to your organization will increase their financial contribution (http://www.kellogg.northwestern.edu/marketing/faculty/MarketingCamp/aaker_jennifer.pdf).
  4. Camper Behavior Management:  When a camper has behavioral problems at camp, who are the best people to recommend strategies for that child?  The Parents!  I hope all camps utilize family input to help their campers have a successful session of camp.
  5. Marketing:  Yes.  It is so important I said it twice.

So what can parents get out of this partnership?  Good question – and I am prepared to answer.  Here’s my Top 3 List on Partnering with Parents (Parent Perspective):

  1. Camp Staff as a Resource:  Parents, you have a year-round resource when you partner with your summer camp.  Are you looking for a great game idea or your child’s next birthday parts?  Call Camp.  Have a question about your child’s participation/obsession with Facebook?  Call Camp.  Looking for a year-round leadership program that you child can participate in?  Call Camp.  Your camp staff know kids.  They know kids programs and how to find them.  Use their expertise!
  2. Camp Facility as a Resource:  Looking for an affordable location for your next family reunion, birthday party or corporate conference?  Call Camp!  Your camp probably has what you need, and if they don’t, I bet they can help you find a good alternative.
  3. Camp for Resume Building:  Need something new on your resume or just looking for a meaningful volunteer opportunity?  Ask Camp.  Most camps, private and non-profit, utilize volunteers for everything from improving their grounds and setting their policies.  Join the board of directors or plant flowers.  Either way, your camp will appreciate your service.

My Advice for Camps:  Determine what level of parent involvement would be beneficial to your program – and then solicit that involvement.  Family engagement in your program is a long-term investment – but it can pay long-term dividends, as well. 

My Advice for Parents:  Talk to your camp director before registering your child to attend camp.  Learn his or her attitude toward parent involvement in summer camp and select a camp program and leader that matches your needs.  If you’re looking for a camp you can be involved with – on any level – put your summer camp director on the spot and tell her how you can contribute.  Dare her to take you up on it.  The camp will be better for your input. 

We’ll see you at Camp!

Nathan

Be sure to visit Nathan’s camp, The South Mountain YMCA Camps, at www.smymca.org.

FORGET PHONES – IT’S TIME TO TALK TABLETS

Yesterday afternoon I was talking to my Summer Camps Director about our upcoming season.  She recently attended a conference and was visibly relieved that a pair of speakers at the event spoke about society’s impending retreat from technology.  The speakers believed, as many camp professionals may hope, that our inexorable march toward increased connectivity and information technology would reverse.

My thought:  Dream on.

Since the invention of the printing press, society has walked a straight line toward a future of increased information sharing.  While there were detractors of the first telephones, every household in America eventually had a landline.  There were detractors of cell phones – still are, in fact – but society has embraced them.

Last year I wrote about the place cell phones have in summer camp.  For parents, I recommended they call the camp before sending their child to make sure they understood the organization’s cell phone policy.  For camps, I asked them to review their policies annually to know where they stand in relation to society.

But talking about cell phones was not looking forward; it was looking 10 years back and trying to catch up.  Today, I want to look to the future and a few short months away.

As I write this on Thanksgiving Eve, 2010, I know of 9 alternatives to the iPad device that Apple launched this year (http://mashable.com/2010/01/27/9-upcoming-tablet-alternatives-to-the-apple-ipad/).  These tablets are miraculous devices that allow a user to read a blog, watch a movie, surf the web, or read a book.  There are literally thousands of apps for each device, but I want to focus on just two – music and reading.

By next summer, campers will be asking their parents if they can take their tablet device to camp.  As a parent or camp professional, you should know how you will respond.  First imagine the device, due to a lack of 3G/4G coverage or WiFi, will be unable to surf the web.  Would you allow the device to be brought to camp so a child or teen can read their downloaded literary content?  Can a camper pack his or her iPad to listen to Taio Cruz while reading Moby Dick?

While we all discourage campers from packing expensive items that could be lost, broken or even stolen from a camp environment, most camps do allow kids to pack their MP-3 players and whatever book they may be reading at the moment.  So, will you deny them their iPad?

On principle, it would seem odd to deny them the device – at least for the reading or music functionality – simply because we, as adults, are not used to consuming our media in this fashion.  Despite my love of hardback books, I have to accept the fact that my children may never crack the spine of War and Peace.  Instead, my precious girls may read literary masterpieces on small, hand-held screens.

Take this a step further.  You’ve come this far with me; walk a little longer down this path to next summer.  Imagine your camp does have WiFi or 3G service.  What will you do about tablet devices in this scenario?  In such an environment, the full functionality of such a device would be brought to bear:  email, Facebook, Twitter, movies, tv, books, blogs, and much more.

This is the moment at which even the most tech savvy parents and camp professionals cringe.  We don’t want to picture our kids in the dining hall or walking down a mountain path reading about Katy Perry’s marriage to Russell Brand.

My Untested Advice?  1)  Don’t allow electronic devices in camp, OR  2)  If you don’t operate in the stone age and desire to stay relevant, allow the tablets in for music and books.  Make sure both parents and campers understand that these devices could be lost or broken and that the camp is not responsible, but allow them.  Draw up some clear guidelines about appropriate times for use and make sure these guidelines are shared with parents and campers.  Ask that all devices have their networked connections turned off and make it clear that staff may periodically check them.  If you are a camp professional, make sure your WiFi connections are password protected and that you do your best to keep kids off the internet during their camp experience (unless, of course, your camp is a computer/web/gaming camp).

I qualified the previous paragraph saying that it was untested advice.  Someone smarter than me will come up with better plans (please share them in the comments section of this blog), and ultimately the tech will continue to evolve.  We will continue to evolve in response to that tech.

There will be times next summer you will long for the days before all this tech, but let it go.  That ship has sailed. 

We’ll see you at Camp!

Nathan

Be sure to visit Nathan’s camp, The South Mountain YMCA Camps, at www.smymca.org.