This has been a big week for the Y (https://nsbrant.wordpress.com/2010/07/12/brave-new-y-the-ymca-announces-rebranding/).  Looking towards its future, the organization has finished its rebranding process announcing a new logo and a renewed focus on Youth Development, Healthy Lifestyles, and Social Responsibility (www.ymca.net).  As a movement, we are also celebrating our past this week.  On July 14th, YMCA Camps and their alumni will be sharing a National Campfire to celebrate the our 125th year of summer camp programs. 

Your eyes did not deceive you.  The YMCA has been offering summer camp programs since 1885 when Sumner Dudley and a small group of youth headed to Orange Lake, New York, for the summer.  Since then, approximately 350 YMCA camps grace the shores, forests, and fields of this beautiful country (http://www.ymca.net/find-a-y-camp/).  The Y also operates more than 2000 day camps nationally.  In total, 1.5 million people participate in YMCA summer camping programs, conference centers, outdoor education classes, and family camps. 

Summer Camp at the South Mountain YMCA

 

I began this post with the Y’s renewed  focus on 1) Youth Development, 2) Healthy Lifestyles, and 3) Social Responsibility.  This has always been part of the fabric of Y Camping programs.  I want to take a few paragraphs to share exactly how our camps accomplish these lofty goals.  

Youth Development.  As I have mentioned in other posts, I strongly believe in the power of summer camp to positively impact the development of a young person.  When Y camping is at its best, it teaches campers: 

  1. How to lead and how to be a responsible member of a group being led
  2. The character required to be humble in victory and gracious in defeat
  3. How to identify and safely manage risk
  4. Who they are beyond the established perceptions of their families and peers back home
  5. The independence associated with living beyond a parental safety net
  6. How to live with others, build consensus, and share their time, space, and thoughts
  7. To celebrate the differences that make us unique, as well as those things that unite us
  8. The intrinsic joy in doing good for others

This list could go on, but we’ve all got work to do today.  I will leave it to others to add to this humble start. 

Healthy Lifestyles.  In a society where we struggle with childhood obesity, diabetes, and depression, we have all heard the message that our children need to be active for at least an hour a day.  This is not something we worry about in camping.  We worry about scheduling in a “rest hour” each day so our campers can gather themselves to run-all-out for another 6 hours before bed.  At camp, kids may walk a couple hundred yards to the bathroom, they make travel a 1/2 mile to eat breakfast in the dining hall.  For 12-14 hours a day, kids are engaged and active.  Kids play.  More importantly, campers learn outdoor pursuits they can continue to enjoy long after they graduate from high school and college.  A child may never play field hockey after high school, but she can certainly continue to kayak or rock climb.  A young man may be done with football after college, but he can still go camping or play frisbee golf.  I learned to play guitar at summer camp – I still play today.   

Social Responsibility.   There are some amazing things happening in your Y camps this summer.  Kids are cleaning their cabins, making their beds, and sweeping the floor – things they may never do at home.  So why do they do it at camp?  Because it matters to their peers – there is a level of responsiblity to the campers in your cabin.  This is because camps recognize the cleanest cabin – not the cleanest single bunk.  Many camps around the country require campers to participate in the care and upkeep of the facility they all share.  Campers maintain the volleyball courts, clean up the sports fields, and may even work on the bathrooms.  These are just the basics. 

Our camps offer Leaders-In-Training programs (LIT) and Counselors-In-Training sessions (CIT).  We teach leadership.  We teach how to care for others.  We build the foundations of positive communities through our programs.  Finally, if you have less familiarity the YMCA Camping history, you may be unaware of the Raggers & Leathers program.  It began almost 100 years ago and helps young people focus on personal goals throughout the year – beyond summer camp – and to live for others.  I love this program. 

“This program is designed to help people take a closer look at  themselves in relationship to their own strengths and weaknesses, religious beliefs and relationships that surround them. It provides an opportunity to promote positive growth.  YMCA’s use the Rag / Leather Program as a tool to encourage quality time between staff and members, counselors, and campers.  Growth in spirit, mind and body is incorporated into the program. This program also follows in line with what YMCA’s strive to accomplish through their mission.  Each Rag and Leather has a specific challenge and is accompanied by a personal goal developed by the individual.  Participation in  the program is enhanced by the use of tradition, resource materials and one-on-one sharing sessions.”  http://christianleadershipconf.org/ 

For me, camping has been the YMCA at its best.  Given tonight’s YMCA National Campfire event (http://www.ymca.net/news-releases/20100511-camping-anniversary.html), I wanted to take a few moments and honor our history and our accomplishments.  For 125 years, Y Camps have provided positive experiences that last a lifetime.  May that good work continue for another 125 years. 

Camp Conrad Weiser's Opening Campfire

 

Tonight, on July 14th, light a fire and share the stories of summers-gone-by with your friends and families.  Roast a marshmallow, sing a song, and marvel at what it means that Y Camping has been part of our culture for 125 years. 

We’ll see you at Camp! 

Nathan

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