Thank you for participating in the poll that made this post possible. 

As the camping industry has grown more sophisticated (and it has, check our websites), we have realized that there is a disparity between what our families perceive as risks in our summer programs and what we perceive as our actual risks.  In preparing this post, I expected that gap.  What I did not expect was that my own perception of the risks associated with summer camp would be different from folks in the insurance industry.

In the last two weeks, I have had the opportunity to talk with two very helpful insurance professionals.  Many thanks to Morris Gold of Sobel Affiliates, A Division of Brown & Brown, whose company specializes in summer camp among other things.  I also need to thank Howard Longino (@h2lifesaver for those of you in Twitterland) who works with the Redwoods Group, a company specializing in camps, YMCAs, JCCs, and other organizations.  In the interest of disclosure, Sobel Affiliates is my insurance provider with the South Mountain YMCA and Camp Conrad Weiser.  The Redwoods Group insured the Akron YMCA and Camp Y-Noah when I worked with those organizations in Ohio.

In the poll I placed on my LinkedIn page for parents, I asked the following question:

Assuming all equipment is in good repair and staff are well-trained, identify the riskiest activity for a child.

  1. High Ropes / Climbing Towers
  2. Swimming (in a pool)
  3. Horseback Riding
  4. Field Games
  5. Swimming (in “open” water like a river, lake, or ocean)

Parents responded by saying that they perceived Open Water Swimming as the most risky activity on the list (50%), followed by Horseback Riding (23%), High Ropes/Climbing Towers (13%), Swimming in Pools (6%), and Field Games (6%).  For those of you that participated in the poll, congratulations!  You correctly identified the number one concern of both camping programs and those that insure them. 

For both of the insurance industry professionals I spoke to, Aquatics is the #1 risk in summer camp programs.  Surprising to me (and apparently to those who responded to the poll), the industry does not generally draw a distinction between open water scenarios and pools.  As Howard Longino put it, aquatic programs and camper transportation are both huge areas of exposure because they “provide a significant potential for fatality.”  When you take a step back, this shouldn’t surprise you.  While we, as Americans, have accepted the risks associated with automobile travel, we are still aware of the possible consequences.  Likewise, I think we understand that there is rarely a minor injury associated with water.  The good new is that your camp is aware of these risks, too.

Keeping your Kids Safe this Summer:  If your camp is accredited by the American Camp Association (ACA), they spend a lot of time training and testing staff for both transportation and aquatics programs. They know how to keep children safe in these areas.  The same can be said for high ropes and climbing tower programs.

Horses.  Anyone who works extensively with horses has a healthy respect for programs that mix people and large animals.  Your camps believe this is a program with real risk – and they respond accordingly.  In my conversations with insurance industry professionals, neither mentioned equestrian activities as an area of concern. 

Keeping your Kids Safe this Summer:  If your camp is providing equestrian programs, make sure they are ACA and Certified Horsemanship Association (CHA) accredited.  Again, accreditation by these organizations means the staff has been trained and the facility and program have been reviewed by someone other than the camp staff.

Field Games.  Brace yourself.  According to industry experts, this is where your child is most likely to be injured this summer.  No kidding.  The most common injuries in camping are foot and knee problems that occur in court and field sports.  But, PLEASE, don’t keep your child off the playing field this summer – childhood obesity as a result of inactivity is a far greater, life-changing problem than a sprained ankle.  Keep your kids active.

Keeping your Kids Safe this SummerAs Howard Longino points out, “it’s an issue of hazards to the activity like improper footwear.”  Your kids want flip-flops, and that will be fine at the pool, but send them to camp in sneakers so they are prepared to play.

Both Morris and Howard stressed a risk that did not appear on my original poll – bullying & abuse.  Your summer camp is aware of these risks, and they screen, background check, and train their staff accordingly.  Next week I’ll share some resources that can help you talk to your child about these problems.  Often the best thing we can do for our kids is keep open lines of communication.

Please remember that each day we choose to step outside our doors and wander into the wider world, we are exposed to risk.  I think that Camp can help.  I think a good camp program can teach your child how to identify and manage risk.  Those skills are essential to raising an independent, creative child in today’s world – and camps are good at it.

We’ll see you at Camp!

Nathan

Be sure to visit Nathan’s camp, The South Mountain YMCA Camps, at www.smymca.org.

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